Homeland Security Minor

20 semester hours

The minor in homeland security is built on the existing body of knowledge in homeland security and emergency management as well as developing research, with an emphasis on lessening the impacts of disasters on society’s most vulnerable citizens. The proposed minor prepares students for public service and partnership with the local community (private, nonprofit and public), and will provide opportunities for students to transfer acquired skills into the work environment, thereby contributing to economic development and a society more prepared to meet hazards, emergencies, terrorist threats or disasters.

Required Courses: 8 semester hours
CRJ3200 Homeland Security (4)
CRJ3350 Terrorism and Counterterrorism (4)

Selected Courses: Choose 12 semester hours*
CRJ2400 Principles of Emergency Management (4)
CRJ3100 Security Leadership (4)
CRJ3550 Cyber Crime Investigations (4)
CRJ4400 Introduction to Intelligence Policy (4)

The focus of this course is the complex and ever-changing nature of homeland security in America. The development of the present system of the protection of our homeland is explored by examining the history of security threats to our nation. Students will learn about how the beginning of the Cold War period shaped America’s policies in the Korean War, the Cuban Missile Crisis and in Vietnam. The progressive nature of domestic and international terrorism that culminated in the single largest attack by a foreign enemy on American soil will be explained. In addition, the effect of natural disasters that impact our homeland security priorities will be identified.

Semester hours: 4

Prerequisite(s): CRJ1010.

This course attempts to explain why terrorists “do what they do” by exploring the history of terrorism and shedding light on likely future scenarios. By design, the emphasis is on key historical themes rather than abstract theory. Related topics include international terrorism, religiously motivated terrorism, suicidal terrorism and how the media is used to shape public opinions about terrorist acts.

Semester hours: 4

This course examines the historical context of emergency management to the present day evolution into the world of homeland security. Focus is on the disciplines of the emergency management process: mitigation, preparedness, communications, response and recovery.  Students will be provided with a background in international emergency management policies and challenged to develop their own ideas about the future of emergency management in America.

Semester hours: 4

This course is about effective leadership in the workplace, specifically as it relates to private security. We will discuss and contrast the relationships between private protection services and public law enforcement. A crime prevention model will be developed and used to shape our analysis of the justice system as it relates to both public and private policing. Students will become acquainted with basic principles of security, loss prevention and situational crime prevention that are common and fundamental to all areas of business and assets protection. In addition, concepts underlining situational crime prevention will be discussed with references to contemporary theory and research findings.

Semester hours: 4

Prerequisite(s): CRJ1010.

This course explores how a “networked” world has bred new crimes and new responses. It investigates how information and communication technology (ICT) has become a tool, a target, and a place of criminal activity and national security threats, as well as a mechanism of response. This course addresses such questions as how emerging technologies challenge existing laws and criminal procedures; what reasonable expectations of privacy are in cyberspace; and how control is shifting from traditional mechanisms of law enforcement to new regulatory regimes, including technology. The focus of this course is how the emergence of advanced information societies challenges certain prevailing social and philosophical constructs of criminal justice, social control and individual freedom.

Semester hours: 4

This course is designed to give students an understanding of the role intelligence plays in making national security policy and insight into its strengths and weaknesses. The history and an overview of the U.S. intelligence community will be explored. Focus will be on the intelligence processes: requirements, collection, analysis, dissemination and policy. Additional topics will include covert action and counter intelligence. Students will be required to debate and form their own conclusions about how the U.S. intelligence community operates.

Semester hours: 4