Course Descriptions - Biology

BIO1060 Human Biology   
4 semester hours
The course examines the human organism and the impact of modern biology and medicinal discoveries on humans. Topics covered include anatomy/physiol­ogy, immunity, reproduction, development, genetics, and the relationship between humans and their environment. No laboratory requirement.
No prerequisites.
Meets General Education “Observation of the Natural World” requirement.

 

BIO1210 Biology of Cells   
4 semester hours
This course studies the cell as the basic unit of biology. Topics include classifica­tion of living organisms, acellular and cellular organisms; structure and roles of biologically important molecules; prokaryote and eukaryote cell structure; con­cepts of metabolism and energy flow; enzymes; photosynthesis; ATP production; cell reproduction; molecular genetics; and the principles of Mendelian genetics. Laboratory exercises are coordinated with lecture topics.
No prerequisites.
Meets General Education “Observation of the Natural World” requirement.


BIO1220 Biology of Organisms   
4 semester hours
This course is an introductory-level biology class that provides students with an overview of the fundamentals of evolution, diversity of life, and ecology. The course will also emphasize how the scientific method is used to gain an under­standing of these concepts. (Spring)
Prerequisite:  BIO1210.


BIO2200 Humans and the Environment   
4 semester hours
This course provides students with an overview of the relationship between humans and their environment. Specifically, the course will introduce students to the environmental problems that we face including human population growth, air pollution, water pollution, loss of biological diversity and energy usage, and dis­cusses potential solutions to these problems. We also investigate local environ­mental issues.
No prerequisites.
Meets General Education “Observation of the Natural World” requirement.


BIO2280 Microbiology   
4 semester hours
This course covers microbial principles and techniques for application in other fields or as a first course in the advanced study of microbiology. Topics include the structure and life cycles of bacteria and viruses, characteristics of the major groups of bacteria, bacterial metabolism identification, selected microbial diseases and the multiple roles of bacteria. Laboratory exercises include staining techniques, bacterial and phage culture, control of microbes and identification of unknowns using metabolic and morphologic characteristics plus selected topics.
Prerequisite: BIO1210 with a grade of “C” or higher.

 

BIO2650 Essentials of Anatomy and Physiology           
4 semester hours
This biology course is a study of the interrelationship between structure and function in the human body at the macro, micro, and cellular levels.  An emphasis is placed on how physiological mechanisms operate to maintain homeostasis.  Physiological systems covered include the tissues, integumentary system, temperature control, skeletal, muscular, nervous, endocrine, cardiac, respiratory, digestive, renal and reproductive systems.  Lab exercises that include CD-ROM simulations, animations, models, Vernier technology and dissections are coordinated with lecture material.
Prerequisites: BIO1210 and BIO1220.  Credit WILL NOT be given for this course and BIO2660 and or BIO2670.
 


BIO2660 Anatomy and Physiology I   
4 semester hours
Detailed study of the relationship between structure and function of an organism with an emphasis on the human system. Physical-chemical principles related to the major organ systems, including integumentary, muscular, skeletal, nervous, and the senses. A partial course in anatomy and physiology. Lab exercises are coordinated with lecture material. (Fall)
Prerequisite: BIO1210.

 

BIO2670 Anatomy and Physiology II   
4 semester hours
Adds to the topics of Anatomy and Physiology I the aspects of endocrine, diges­tive, respiratory, cardiovascular and urogenital systems, immunity and reproduc­tion. Anatomy and Physiology I and II make a complete course in anatomy and physiology. Lab exercises emphasize and expand lecture principles. (Spring)
Prerequisite: BIO2660 with a grade of “C” or higher.

 

BIO2750 Health Professions Seminar   
2 semester hours
Designed for students with a definite interest in one of the health professions. This course introduces the student to the basic health care environment and examines the roles and responsibilities of various occupations and the issues affecting the quality and form of health care in America. Economic, political, soci­ological, psychological, and ethical problems facing health care professionals will also be discussed. (Fall)
No prerequisites. 

  

BIO3040 Immunology   
4 semester hours
The principles and applications of immunology.  Includes study of the anatomy, physiology, and genetics of the immune system, the cellular and antibody response to bacteria, viruses, fungi, protozoa, and worms, and the immune response to tumors. Also includes the study of immune disorders, including hypersensitivity, allergy, autoimmunity, and immune deficiency.  Immunologic techniques will be discussed, studied in the laboratory, and applications to research, testing, and diagnosis will be covered.
Prerequisite: BIO1210.

 

BIO3050 Pathophysiology   
3 semester hours
Integrates the pathological processes of disease with those of the “normal” func­tioning body. Cellular and organismal disease mechanisms are studied with ref­erence to specific diseases, with opportunity to apply this learning to actual case studies.
Prerequisite: BIO2670 with a grade of “C” or higher.

 

BIO3080 Nutrition and Health Promotion                                             
4 semester hours
How nutrition impacts the health of the individual will be investigated. A bio­chemical, cellular, and physiological approach to carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, vitamins, and minerals and how the body responds to excess and deficiency of these foodstuffs will be addressed. Current topics include links between diet and various diseases; nutritional trends; weight management; food-borne illness; diet and exercise; how the diet affects arterial aging and the immune system; and nutrition myths and misinformation.
Prerequisites: BIO2670, CHM1200 or CHM1310, CHM1320.
Meets General Education “Observation of the Natural World” requirement.

 

BIO3150 Invertebrate Biology   
4 semester hours
This course provides an overview of the invertebrate animals beginning with sponges and ending with cephalochordates. Emphasis will be placed on identifi­cation of invertebrates, and descriptions of key characteristics and evolutionary innovations of the invertebrate phyla and classes using a comparative approach. Laboratory will involve field trips and making detailed comparisons among selected invertebrate types through behavioral observation, microscopy and dis­section.  (Every other year)
Prerequisite: BIO1220.

 

BIO3250 Vertebrate Biology   
4 semester hours
This course provides an overview of the vertebrate animals beginning with fishes and ending with mammals. Emphasis will be placed on identification of verte­brates, and descriptions of key characteristics and evolutionary innovations of the vertebrate classes using a comparative approach. Laboratory will involve field trips and making detailed comparisons among selected vertebrate types through behavioral observation, microscopy and dissection. (Every other year)
Prerequisite: BIO1220.

 

BIO3260 Comparative Botany   
4 semester hours
This course covers the basic structure and selected functions of flowering plants, adaptations to specific environmental factors, a comparison of the major plant groups from algae to angiosperms, and characteristics of selected families of higher plants. The interactions between humans and plants will be emphasized. The laboratory exercises include topics in plant morphology, reproduction, life cycles, identification, and research design.  (Fall)
Prerequisites: BIO1210, BIO1220.
Meets General Education “Observation of the Natural World” requirement.

 

BIO3270 Plant Physiology   
4 semester hours
This course covers the functional and related structural aspects of the higher green plants. Topics include transport of water and nutrients; mineral require­ments, including deficiency symptoms and availability from soil; photosynthesis; respiration; plant regulators; plant movements; and responses to light and tem­perature. Laboratory activities and a final project or projects are integrated into the lecture sections. (Every other year)
Prerequisites: BIO1210, BIO1220.

 

BIO3360 Biogerontology   
4 semester hours
This course covers the modern biological aspects of aging. Students need to dis­tinguish pathophysiological conditions from “normal aging” of the human body. The theory of aging and how nutrition, exercise, stress, and social interaction affect aging will be discussed.
Prerequisite: BIO2670.

 

BIO3370 Conservation Biology                                                            
4 semester hours
This course provides an introduction to conservation biology and conservation practice.  Topics will focus on the earth’s biological diversity, threats to its biological diversity, how threats influ­ence populations and species, and solutions to dealing with those threats.  Real-world applications and conservation techniques will be investigated in lab. (Every other year)
Prerequisite: BIO1220 or BIO2200. 

 

BIO3380 Ethics in Biotechnology   
3 semester hours
Introduction to the field of biotechnology, emphasizing the complex interactions between biotechnology and society.  Includes discussion of historical and contemporary issues.
Prerequisite: BIO2280 or BIO3400.

 

BIO3400 Genetics   
4 semester hours
This course includes both molecular and organismal genetics. The structure and functions of nucleic acids; gene action and regulation; and the principles of genetic engineering and cloning are covered as well as the inheritance of auto­somal and sex-linked traits, gene interactions, eukaryote and bacterial genetics; and polygenic inheritance. The interactions of the field of genetics and society including ethical issues will also be addressed.
Prerequisites: MTH1100, BIO1210.


BIO3450 Advanced Cell Biology   
4 semester hours
The integration of structure and function of living things on the cellular level. Topics include cell physiology, molecular biology, immunology, and develop­mental biology.
Prerequisites: BIO2670, BIO3400, CHM1320.


BIO3510 Ecology   
4 semester hours
This course provides an introduction to ecology including examinations of an organism’s relationship to its environment, population ecology, community ecology landscape ecology, and ecosystem ecology. In this course we will also explore the biodiversity in our region, perform small-scale experiments, and learn the process of inquiry by designing and conducting an ecological research project. (Fall)
Prerequisite: BIO1220 or BIO2200.


BIO3520 Animal Behavior   
3 semester hours
This course provides an introduction to animal behavior including overviews of proximate and ultimate causes of behavior, and detailed discussions of topics in behavioral ecology such as predation, foraging, habitat selection, mating, and social interactions. (Spring)
Prerequisite: BIO1220.


BIO3530 Evolution   
4 semester hours
This course provides an introduction to evolutionary biology including exami­nations of evidence for evolution, mechanisms of evolutionary change, adapta­tion, speciation, extinction, and history of life. In this course, we will also perform computer simulations and read primary literature articles on evolution. (Spring)
Prerequisite: BIO1220.


BIO3540 Biological Anthropology               
4 semester hours
This course provides students with an overview of the human species in the context of its evolutionary relationships with other primates.  Specifically, the course will introduce students to the interrelated realms of knowledge that shed light on leading hypotheses for human evolution, biology and behavior. These realms of knowledge include the fossil record, molecular evolutionary trees, primatology, evolutionary biology, history of science, human biology, forensics and psychology.  We will discuss scientific findings from these fields to understand our origins and contemporary issues in human biology, science and society.
No prerequisites.


BIO/CHM3550 Biochemistry   
3 semester hours
Introduction to structure, properties, function, and metabolism of proteins, car­bohydrates, lipids, and nucleic acids, emphasizing enzymology, bioenergetics, and metabolic regulation.  Includes laboratory studies.
Prerequisite: CHM2410 with a grade of “C” or higher.


BIO3600 Molecular Biology   
3 semester hours
Introduction to theory, concepts, and techniques of molecular biology.  This course integrates discussion and analyses of concepts, theories, and techniques of the molecular biosciences and explores how they are applied in various fields, including basic and applied biological research, biotechnological efforts, medical procedures, and pharmaceutical development. This course includes a laboratory. 
Prerequisites:  BIO1210, CHM2410.
Co-requisite: BIO3600Z.


BIO/CHM3650 Instrumental Methods of Analysis    
4 semester hours
Fundamentals of instrumental and classical methods of analysis. Introduction to biological and chemical sample preparation, separation techniques, volumetric, electrochemical and spectroscopic methods. Laboratory work combines classical and instrumental methods of analysis.
Prerequisites: BIO1210, MTH1100 and CHM1320.
Co-requisite: CHM/BIO3650Z Instrumental Methods of Analysis Laboratory (0 semester hours)


BIO/PSC/SOC700 Politics of Global Health and Medicine       
4 semester hours
The course addresses the question of how social and political factors, such as race, nationality or social class, as well as governmental laws, regulations and politics shape and are shaped by individual and population health and well-being around the world.  Among other questions, students discuss the impact of structural violence of social inequalities on human suffering and on the access to health care and medical care, including access to medications.  The ethicality of medical research is also included in that discussion.  Assigned readings and discussions address (1) the determinants of disease and health inequalities between populations and over time; (2) how social and political factors influence medical knowledge, health care and medical care; and 3) what must be done to combat and prevent health inequalities in local, national and global contexts.
No prerequisites. 


BIO3790 ACCA Affiliated Course   
2-4 semester hours
Aurora University in collaboration with the other Associated Colleges of the Chicago Area (ACCA), the Shedd Aquarium, and Morton Arboretum offers a range of courses including lecture series, laboratory courses and field experiences which enrich our core curriculum. These will be offered as student interests and needs indicate.
Prerequisite: Consent of program chair.


BIO3820 Secondary Methods in Biology   
4 semester hours
This course presents techniques that are effective in teaching in the content areas. The course includes lesson planning, classroom arrangement, curriculum design, alternative teaching strategies and evaluation. In addition to the classroom hours there is a simultaneous practicum. This is usually the last course the student takes prior to student teaching. (Fall)
Prerequisites: Acceptance into the College of Education including passing the Basic Skills Test/TAP; maintaining a content GPA of 3.00; passing an FBI national fingerprint screening that encompasses passing a criminal background/sex offender check; passing a TB test; and EDU2200, EDU2260,  EDU3720.  Placement applications for the practicum are due to the College of Education placement coordinator the January before the academic year of the practicum or for transfer students upon acceptance into the College of Education.


BIO3970 Research in Biology                                                           
1-4 semester hours
This course is designed to provide students with the opportunity to do biological research that has the potential to be published in a peer-reviewed scientific jour­nal, and presented at a scientific meeting. Students will accomplish these goals by performing a supervised research project, and attending weekly seminars on how to conduct scientific research.
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

NATURAL SCIENCE
NSM1150 Science Foundations
4semester hours
Explores some of the fundamental physical concepts, including energy and the atomic view of matter, that are necessary to our understanding of science and tech­nology in our world.
Prerequisite: Completion or concurrent enrollment in MTH1100 or higher. Meets General Education “Observation of the Natural World” requirement.


NSM1200 Astronomy
3 semester hours
An introduction to modern astronomy including astronomical observations, astro­physical tools and laws, the solar system, stars, galaxies, and cosmology.
No prerequisites. Meets General Education “Observation of the Natural World” requirement.


NSM1300 Earth Science
4 semester hours
This course includes an overview of those sciences that collectively seek to under­stand our dynamic Earth and its relationship to the larger universe. Includes mate­rial from the fields of geology, oceanography, meteorology and astronomy through which we examine the physical laws and natural processes that have helped to shape and change the Earth and the universe around it.
No prerequisites. Meets General Education “Observation of the Natural World” requirement.


NSM2500 Integrated Mathematics and Science for Teachers  
4 semester hours
This course presents an integrated approach to Mathematics and Science and their applications to problem solving. Topics in science include exploration of fundamental physical concepts, including transformation of energy, force and motion, waves, electricity and magnetism, and the atomic view of matter. Topics in mathematics include real numbers, representation and evaluation of functions, properties of linear and nonlinear functions, problem solving with and without linear equations, problem solving and representation of systems of linear equations, the relationship between symbolic expressions and graphs of lines. 
Prerequisite: MTH1220 or consent of the Mathematics Department.NOTE: Successful completion of MTH1210, MTH1220, NSM2500 satisfies the mathematics competency requirement for graduation for Elementary Education majors.


NSM1600 Science Technology Engineering and Mathematics Pre-Service Teacher Immersion Experience, STEM TIE I
1 semester hour
The course provides an immersion experience to observe firsthand the teaching of mathematics and science in an elementary classroom. The pre-service teacher will be placed in an accredited public or private school for 4-6 hours of elementary classroom observation experience.  The student will have an opportunity to observe the classroom environment, teacher’s use of technology and teacher-student interactions. This course will provide information on observation protocols, reflective practices, pedagogical techniques and connections to relevant mathematics and science applications.
No prerequisites.


NSM1700 Science Technology Engineering and Mathematics Pre-Service Teacher Immersion Experience, STEM TIE II
1 semester hour
The course provides an immersion experience to observe firsthand the teaching of mathematics and science in an elementary classroom. The student will be placed in an accredited public or private school for 4-6 hours of elementary classroom observation experience.  The student will have the opportunity to observe assessment practices, differentiated instruction, and teacher-student interactions. The student will also participate in small group tutoring and reflect through journaling on the assessment of teaching and learning in the small group.  This course will provide information on observation protocols, reflective practices, pedagogical techniques, and connections to relevant mathematics and science applications.
Prerequisite: NSM1600.


NSM2600 Science Technology Engineering and Mathematics Pre-Service Teacher Immersion Experience, STEM TIE III
1 semester hour
The course provides an opportunity to practice teaching mathematics and science in an elementary classroom. The student will be placed in an accredited public or private school for 4-6 hours of classroom experience.  The student will develop and teach two lesson plans on extended responses and a lesson plan on the integration of mathematics and science in literature. This course will provide information on reflective practices, pedagogical techniques and connections to relevant mathematics and science applications.
Prerequisite: NSM1700.


NSM2700 Science Technology Engineering and Mathematics Pre-Service Teacher Immersion Experience, STEM TIE IV
1 semester hour
The course provides an opportunity to develop and implement 4-5 activities integrating mathematics and science. The student will be placed in an accredited public or private school for 4-6 hours of elementary classroom experience. The course will provide information on reflective practices, pedagogical techniques, assessment techniques and connections to relevant mathematics and science applications.
Prerequisite: NSM2600.


NSM2700 Science Technology Engineering and Mathematics Pre-Service Teacher Immersion Experience, STEM TIE IV
1 semester hour
The course provides an opportunity to develop and implement 4-5 activities integrating mathematics and science. The student will be placed in an accredited public or private school for 4-6 hours of elementary classroom experience. The course will provide information on reflective practices, pedagogical techniques, assessment techniques and connections to relevant mathematics and science applications.
Prerequisite: NSM2600.


NSM3600 STEM Industrial Pre-Service Teacher Immersion Experience
2 semester hours (80 hours for 2-4weeks) 
The course provides an opportunity to participate in an immersion experience at two STEM-related industry partners.  The student will be expected to have at least 80 hours of total immersion experience and will be able to work with a mentor or facilitator at the partner site. The student will have an opportunity to observe and work in an industrial environment.  The immersion will provide an opportunity to understand STEM applications in various disciplines and reflect on how this experience can be integrated with the curriculum in a K-5 classroom.  
Prerequisite: NSM2700.


NSM3100WI Research and Writing Methods in the Natural Sciences
3 semester hours
Basic research methodology and the scientific method of inquiry for biological and natural science research are stressed.  Concepts, methods, and experimental designs involved in the statistical evaluation and presentation of research data are evaluated and integrated into effective communication. Development of scientific proposals, revision of manuscripts, and scientific writing and bibliographic citation form the core of this Writing Intensive course. Course includes instruction in statistical and GIS software packages.  (Spring)
Prerequisites: IDS2000 with a grade of “C” or higher; BIO1210 or its equivalent; MTH1100 or MTH1110; junior or senior with a minimum of 20 semester hours of coursework in the natural sciences. Meets Writing Intensive requirement.


NSM3790 ACCA Affiliated Course
2-4 semester hours
Aurora University in collaboration with the other Associated Colleges of the Chicago Area (ACCA), the Shedd Aquarium, and Morton Arboretum, offers a range of courses including lecture series, laboratory courses and field experiences which enrich our core curriculum. These will be offered as student interests and needs indicate.
Prerequisite: Consent of program chair.


NSM3970 Research in Natural Sciences
3 semester hours
This course is designed to provide students with the opportunity to do research in the natural sciences that has the potential to be published in a peer-reviewed scientific journal, and presented at a scientific meeting. Students will accomplish these goals by performing a supervised research project, and attending weekly seminars on how to conduct scientific research.
Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.


NSM4970 Advanced Research in Natural Sciences
3 semester hours
This course is designed to provide students with the continued opportunity to do research in natural sciences that has the potential to be published in a peer- reviewed scientific journal, and presented at a scientific meeting. Students will accomplish these goals by performing a supervised research project, and attend­ing weekly seminars on how to conduct scientific research.
Prerequisites: NSM3970; consent of instructor.


NSM4990 Senior Capstone in Natural Sciences
3 semester hours
This course explores the interrelationships of the natural sciences and society through the study of a complex problem which includes aspects of biology, med­icine, the environment, ethics, and human actions. The course will include read­ings, writing, class discussions, group projects, and presentations. Information will be gathered from a range of sources including scientific journals, popular lit­erature, computerized literature searches and community resources.
Prerequisite: Junior or senior with a minimum of 20 semester hours of coursework in the natural sciences.